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, freedom from religion, is protesting the memorial and several others, not because of the memorial itself, but they say because there's a cross on the memorial and that, they say, violates the separation of church and state and saying, i'm quoting here, our objection is to the message of endorsement of christianity over other religions and over non-religions. the christian-only memorial sends a message that the government only cares about the deaths of christian soldiers, not jewish, other non-christian and non-religious soldiers. coos bay says this. >> we passed it on to our city attorney to review that and relevant case law. and obviously these cases are happening around the nation. >> trace: again, it becomes a legal fight and the legal fights have been kind of split decisions. remember the cross of mount soledad? that had to be taken down. the mojave memorial was donated to a veterans group, but the supreme court ruled that that did not violate the establishment clause and they allowed that cross to stay. so somebody stole it a couple of years ago, so now it's gone. but legally, it wa
to diminish any form of religion. the goal is to marginalize religious opposition to secular programs. >> well, o'reilly went on to say that they can tell children that those symbols are obsolete and unnecessary then that sets the stage for a totally secular society in the future. what the heck is a spring egg anyway? >> i don't know. you call the spring bunny little candy bunny the spring bunny and peeps. >> easter. >> anyway. okay. although easter is right around the corner. it sure doesn't feel like it. that is landing america's favorite groundhog in some hot water this morning. punxsutawney phil may be heading to court for predicting an early spring. it's true. phil the groundhog has been indicted in ohio for the misrepresentation of early spring. an ohio prosecutor says that phil was calculating and predicting spring despite snow and record cold temperatures that followed. >> i think need more to do that? >> okay. well, let's get your first degree weather update with maria molina. >> good morning. eye have a question are they going to start indicting meteorologists. >> you are are a law-a
people from every walks of life and every religion and if they are willing to work hard they can success. that has to be more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syria situation but the moment of promise and danger in the arab world in north africa. >> thank you, mr. president. of mentioned the aftermath the assad regime. there's a lot of concern that the upheaval is creating extremism. how concerned are you that extremist could take over in syria and, perhaps worse than assad? usas hoping you could give an insight on how you brokered the call to netanyahu. and you have offered asylum that he rejected and does that offer still stand? thank you. >> well, i'm very concerned about syria becoming a place for extremists because extremists thrive in chaos. they thrive in failed states and in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to building things but they are good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functional. they fill that gap. that's why, i think it is so important for us to work with the international community to help accele
, is to publicly recognize the jewish state and the roots of the jews and religion which was important for the rest of the world. >> sean: is that really so good? >> so for him to say that, it was a good things. and now, he wants the palestinians to recognize the jewish state. this is not going to happen. >> sean: i wanted to get your reaction? >> i spent a good amount of time in israel just over a month ago talking with their ministers and talking with the people. they are guarded. that is the only way i can say. they are guarded about american leadership and they understand our culture. we talk about the red line and who gives netanyahu the go ahead and does it meet the reality. net netted is going to have make the decisions he needs to make and he so get past that. get past the obama statements. get past the fact that we know that in 67 hamas was formed by the muslim brotherhood. he wants us to go back to '67 borders but it's not going to happen. >> the hamas charter still calls for the destruction -- >> look at the culture and look at the fact that they keep their people down so they can use th
of life, every background, every religion. and if they've got a good idea and willing to work hard, they can succeed. and that's got to be something that's more consistently spoken about not just you know in the syria situation, but i think with respect to this enormous moment of both promise but also danger in the arab world in north africa. >> julie. >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern in jordan and elsewhere that the upheaval in syria is creating havens for extremism. how concerned are you at this point that extremists or jihadists could actually take over in syria and perhaps be even worse than assad? and i was also hoping you could give us some insight into how you brokered the call today between prime ministers and how much of their willingness to talk is actually driven by the urgency in syria. and, your majesty, you have offered assad asylum which he rejected, does that offer of asylum still stand? thank you. >> well, i am very concerned about syria becoming an enclave for extremists because extremists thriv
of every walk of life. every background, every religion. if they've got a great idea and they're willing to work hard, they can succeed. that's got to be something that's more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syrian situation. but i think with respect to this enormous moment of both promise, but also danger in the arab world. and in north africa. julie pace? >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern in jordan and elsewhere that the upheaval in syria is creating havens for extremism. how concerned are you at this point that extremists or jihadists could actually take over in syria and perhaps be even worse than assad? and i was hoping could give us insight on how you brokered the call between prime ministers erdogan and netenyahu and how much of their talk is driven by the urgency in syria. and your majesty, you've offered assad asylum, which he rejected. does the offer of asylum still stand? thank you. >> i am very concerned about syria becoming an enclave for extremism. because extremists thrive in chaos
by the public religion research institute finds almost two-thirds of all americans are in favor of a path to citizenship. though that number probably doesn't take into account the feelings of the 11 million undocumented americans. it also showed that 71% of americans favor a pathway and a robust 53% of republicans are in favor of one as well. which is all well and good. should we consider what immigrants think? we welcome the great writer who grew up in haiti and immigrated at age 12. she's written many beautiful novels and a book called create dangerously. the immigrant writer at work. she is a genius, certified. it is truly an honor to have you on the show. thank you very much. >> thank you so much for having me. i just remember you as such a novelist before. it has been great to see what's happened to you. >> now we're getting too much. your recent article, you talk about immigrants remain humane treatment. what do you mean? how do you define humane treatment? do you include a 13-year pathway as humane? >> well, humane treatment is basic. you have a detention system now where it is mos
, she spends a lot of time reminiscing and reflecting on the role of religion and it's very much an important piece for her. >> next up is nick in prince frederick, maryland, hi, nick. >> first of all, thank you for this great program. i'm glad you are part of it. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors. the most we have is what of our town centers, we have a plaque. and a book where you get an impression of louisa catherine that she is very involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it is just a surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises that are made during that time. would you mind commenting on those two things? >> that is louisa catherine's birth family. in maryland? do you know of them? >> her family was from maryland. her father was born in maryland. that is very important because that is how she makes her claim that she is an american. i met the war in london, but my father is an american. her uncle was the first governor of maryland. so, she has an important connection w
the world's religions have to that tiny swath of land, and a symbolically rich way for a christian u.s. president to wrap up a trip that has focused on sealing bonds with the jewish state. a trip that the white house and american and israeli officials at this point seem quite pleased with. >> you are in amman, jordan, where the president will be meeting with jordan's king abdullah. he's a very close ally of the u.s. but he is under a tremendous amount of pressure, both internally and externally. so what's on the agenda for the meetings there? >> well, the president lands here in three hours. he's going to have a meeting with king abdullah then speak briefly to the press. only one question on each side and then the two men will have a dinner. as you point out, jordan is a close u.s. ally. the country has a peace treaty with israel. and it's also home to close to 2 million palestinians. so, it would be an important player in any peace negotiations. so that would come up and be up for discussion. but there are other more immediate issues for them right now. syria, jordan has taken in mo
don't believe everything should be put up to a sproept freedom to speech, freedom of religion, freedom to smaer not something we take votes on. it belongs to all of us under the constitution and that is why we have court. >> freedom to marry belongs to everyone, but what marriage is, you're talking about redefining marriage. >> marriage is not defined by who's denied it. >> this isn't "cross fire." i want to end with you. go ahead. >> an odd way to think about constitutional law to sap that the court should refrain from deciding whether something is constitutional or not, even if it would be advantageous for the nation as a whole to have the conversation continue in politics. the court is a passive body. it doesn't get to decide whether to take a case, also doesn't get to decide once a case is befores it, granted review to punt on that case simply because the politician conversation vo continue. something is either constitutional or it's not. >> and they are constitution. >> it's difficult to predict what the high court lieutenant do -- will do in a case like this, based on obama care.
to their religion or ethnicity, are starting to push back in some instances. there is a great deal of concern. i want to assure you, i mentioned i have met people the pre syrian army, and we have highlighted the worries of minority groups and christians, not that we are against the sunni majority of syria. we are not. the minorities are nervous and there might -- their rights must be protected and respected. we hear good things from them. i can tell you for example that they have met christian leaders from some of the communities in syria and have told us afterwards that their meetings were populated. we have to keep pushing in that direction. >> thank you. if you could touch on the chemical weapons issues. was called a red line and there have been reports as recently in the last 24 hours about what is actually happening on the ground, whether they have been used, whether they will be used. if you could just talk about what the administration is doing to prevent the transfer of these weapons to groups. thank you. >> we viewed this issue with extreme seriousness. it is incredibly important to us.
that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. in fact, i would say and be necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. so, there is this conflict, and this conflict is not resolved on the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and people find that quite difficult to understand, aft
, who believe that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. in fact, i would say and be necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. so, there is this conflict, and this conflict is not resolved on the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship, emma. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and peopl
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)